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Kermit the Frog was wrong when he sang ‘It isn’t easy being green”. At Kingfisher Bay Resort being an environmentally responsible traveller is as simple as going on holiday. Kingfisher Bay Resort, a family-friendly property on World Heritage-listed Fraser Island, has been used as an ecotourism benchmark around the world since it opened in 1992. We visited this resort for the first time when our son was five and have returned again and again.

Environmental concerns are a strong focus and motivator in the tourism industry but how does a hotel juggle strict environmental policies along with their guests’ expectations for an enjoyable stay? That’s where the triple bottom line comes in. When ‘environmental’, ‘social’ and ‘economic’ concerns are considered concurrently it’s easier for hoteliers to make the right business decision and help the environment at the same time.

Eco-focussed Junior Rangers kids club program
Eco-focussed Junior Rangers kids club program

Each of the attractive buildings are made from natural timbers to blend into the surrounding environment, large sliding doors allow plenty of natural air circulation and raised boardwalks protect the delicate natural habitat surrounding the resort. Inside the rooms you’ll find delicious smelling eco-friendly products in the bathroom dispensers and suggestions for how to reduce the resort’s environmental footprint. But it’s not enough to focus solely on infrastructure, guest engagement is also crucial for any environmentally sustainable property to truly succeed.

Kingfisher Bay Resort is located on beautiful Fraser Island
Kingfisher Bay Resort is located on beautiful Fraser Island

Not surprisingly, most of the guest activities available at the resort also have an environmental theme. There are guided bush medicine and bird walks, an eco-focussed Junior Rangers kids’ club program and night wildlife spotting expeditions. There is also a surprisingly entertaining trip to the on-site worm farm and – if you’re game – a look at the resort’s self-proclaimed ‘poo farm’ (thankfully far more civilised than it sounds).

Indigenous dining at Kingfisher Bay Resort
Indigenous dining at Kingfisher Bay Resort

Traditional Aboriginal bush tucker is also featured in two activities which focus on sustainability, a free Bush Tucker Walking Tour and a Bush Tucker Talk & Taste session where the head chef cooks bush tucker snacks while a ranger explains each ingredient. This delicious experience is an excellent prelude to dinner at signature resort restaurant Seabelle which draws inspiration from Fraser Island’s indigenous Butchulla tribe.

Bushtucker talk and taste
Bushtucker talk and taste

Start your night with something exotic from the cocktail list like a Fraser Fling, a refreshing vodka cocktail flavoured with Australia’s native rosella flower, then keep the native vibe going with paperbark smoked duck breast served with beetroot, orange and rocket salad and a wattleseed glaze. The atmosphere is laid back with a soundtrack provided by tuneful crickets but the food is five star all the way, something that makes for a relaxing yet memorable evening. Kingfisher Bay Resort proves there’s no need to rough it when it comes to travelling responsibly.

Disclaimer: The writer has stayed as a guest of Kingfisher Bay Resort and also visited the resort at her own expense.

Did you know Queensland is home to three of the world’s largest sand islands which are Fraser Island, Moreton Island, and Stradbroke Island?

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Dr Tiana Templeman is an award-winning food and travel journalist, travel author and media industry academic. She is the creator of The Travel Temple, writes for Australian and international media outlets and appears on radio talking about where to go, what to see and travel industry trends.